Weyermann Abbey Malt – A new kid on the block

Welcome to Kettle to Keg’s new Malt Profile Series, where we’ll break down the extensive grain list that we carry here at the shop.  This series will bring you detailed information on grains so you don’t have to hunt it down yourself.  Today we will be talking about Weyermann Abbey Malt.  This is a newer product for Weyermann and there is not a lot of information about it yet.  As a matter of fact I have not used this malt, which was the impetus for starting this series with this particular grain.

To business then! This is technically a base malt, however be it one with a weak diastatic factor (the ability to convert starch to sugar).  It has some power, but needs to be mixed with true base malts for full conversion.  It is 15 – 19 Lovibond and has a pronounced “malty flavor”, according to the Weyermann website. Due to its weaker diastatic power and the darkness of the color of the grain, the maltsters say that it can be used for up to 50% of the grain bill and would be good in Belgian, Trappist/Monastic, fruit and faro type beers.  In doing my research on this malt, I read a few of recipes and comments that said this grain gave a complex flavor profile when used in a fairly simplistic grain bill.

I am planning on using this grain in my next batch of blonde ale, which I often use as a test bed beer when I will be adding new malts (as I recently did with rye malt).  The modifications (below) give me 16 % of the Abbey malt in the grain bill.  I usually like to start slow when adding new grains, and then brew between two and three renditions of the given beer with increasing amounts of the new malt.  I do this because natural products rarely progress in a linear fashion, usually topping out at some point or becoming more over whelming with smaller inputs.  This practice allows the brewer to dial in the amount of a particular grain, as well as accounting for seasonal variability with very minor adjustment in the grain bill.  The question begs, however, will this be a Belgian/abbey blonde or a blonde with a new back ground flavor?  Only time will tell!

 Blonde Ale* (Original)

Blonde Ale (Modified)

Grain

11.5 pounds – 2 Row

0.5 pounds -Crystal10L

Hops

2.0 ozWillamette4.8 % 60 Min

Mash

152 deg for 1 hour

* From “Brewing Classic Styles”

Grain

10 Pounds – 2 Row

2 Pound – Abbey Malt

Hops

2.0 ozWillamette4.8 % 60 Min

Mash

152 deg for 1 hour

 

If you do choose to brew with this grain, try to do a side-by-side recipes to analyze the difference that this grain makes in your beer. And by all means – bring some into the shop to let us taste what you have done!

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